We have this day restored the Sovereign to Whom all men ought to be obedient. 

He reigns in heaven and from the rising to the setting of the sun, let His kingdom come. 

Samuel Adams, upon signing the Declaration of Independence




        Europeans began sailing to America to make it their home during the 17th century.  Those people, men and women, were an industrious and mostly religious people that were determined to fight for a fresh start with freedom of worship, for a productive life, and for a legacy to their descendants.  With an amazing and energetic spirit, they left behind the security of familiar surroundings to overcome the manifold dangers of the sea and fears of an untamed wilderness for the promise of an uncertain future.  For over 150 years, those diligent and hard-working pioneers, the hardy ones who survived, civilized America.  They grew into an independent and self-made people under the rules of God and away from the British eye.  They worked with a determination, and many found prosperity.

        By the mid 18th century, some of the most vital families gave birth to our founding fathers, although we cannot disregard that there were many founders who overcame humble backgrounds to become themselves a first generation of self-made prominent men.  Almost all were studious, soft-spoken, and well educated in the classics and in being taught high regard for the Bible as the Book of books; and almost all of them were Christians and/or certainly approved of the merits of Christianity as a foundation for mankind and mankind's government.

        In the decision to be free from "an unnatural mother" (the British Crown) and to sign their names to the Declaration, these principled men knew they had little or nothing to gain materially and that they were risking all they had, even their lives.  These pages are dedicated to knowing in honor the names of our founders and knowing that their Christian faith and logic emboldened them with just cause in signing the Declaration of Independence.

Godly Minds, Bold Hearts

Behind the American Defense Against Tyranny


Image:Us declaration independence.jpg


DAR Timeline Grand Old Flag Military Role of Religion Education States Represented Sources Consulted

Above bar of "States Represented" leads to pages on original 13 States and Signers. 

"Role of Religion" leads to topics "Slavery" "Bible" "Prophecy" "Rapture" "Jupiter Hammon"


We finally beg leave to assert that the first planters of these colonies were pious Christians; were faithful subjects; who, with a fortitude and perseverance little known and less considered, settled these wild countries by God’s goodness and their own amazing labors [and] thereby added a most valuable dependence to the crown of Great-Britain; were ever dutifully subservient to her interests; so taught their children that not one has been disaffected to this day; but all have honestly obeyed every royal command and cheerfully submitted to every constitutional law; . . . have carefully avoided every offensive measure . . . have never been troublesome or expensive to the mother country; have kept due order and supported a regular government; have maintained peace and practiced Christianity; and in all conditions and in every relation have demeaned themselves as loyal, as dutiful, and as faithful subjects ought; and that no kingdom or state hath, or ever had, colonies more quiet, more obedient, or more profitable, than these have ever been.

  The Rights of the Colonies Examined  by Stephen Hopkins, Quaker


Those people who will not be governed by God will be ruled by tyrants. 

William Penn 


It is when people forget God that tyrants forge their chains.

 Patrick Henry

If you ask an American, who is his master? He will tell you he has none, nor any governor but Jesus Christ.

  Jonathan Trumbull


We recognize no Sovereign but God, and no King but Jesus!
April 18, 1775, on the eve of the Revolutionary War after a British major ordered John Adams, John Hancock, and those with them to disperse in “the name of George the Sovereign King of England."

We mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.


        The declaration of independence explains why America is just in their cause to separate from England.  It explains that all men are endowed by God with inalienable rights and that the purpose of government is to secure those rights.  Furthermore, such government is granted power only by consent of the governed.  When a government no longer fulfills the purpose to which their power was granted, it is time to break the bonds.  The Declaration explains in detail why the patriots believed King George had acted in a tyrannical manner.  Though they had tried humbly for relief, they were instead given even more injury.  Therefore, they reasoned that King George is no longer fit to reign over a free people.

Shall we, after this, whine and cry for relief, when we have already tried it in vain?  Or shall we supinely sit and see one province after another fall a prey to despotism?  George Washington to Bryan Fairfax July 20, 1774

...I shall not undertake to say where the line between Great Britain and the colonies should be drawn; but I am clearly of opinion, that one ought to be drawn, and our rights clearly ascertained.  I could wish, I own, that the dispute had been left to posterity to determine, but the crisis is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition, that can heaped upon us...   George Washington to Bryan Fairfax, August 24, 1774

       To further their case, they pointed out that the British brethren had also been "deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity." 

Government is frequently and aptly classed under two descriptions--a government of FORCE, and a government of LAWS; the first is the definition of despotism--the last, of liberty.

 Alexander Hamilton, "Tully Papers," 1794


The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them. 

Thomas Jefferson, "The Rights of British America," 1774

And yet the same revolutionary belief for which our forebears fought is still at issue around the globe, the belief that the rights of man come not from generosity of the state but from the hand of God.
John F. Kennedy

The Declaration Committee. Lithograph by Currier & Ives, 1876.  Reproduction number: LC-USZC2-2243 (film copy slide) T. Jefferson, J. Adams, B. Franklin, R. Sherman, R. Livingston.  (Robert Livingston, whose signature is not on the Declaration of Independence, is the nephew of Philip Livingston.) 


And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are a gift of God?

Thomas Jefferson

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America

    When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. — Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

    He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

    He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

    He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

    He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

    He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

    He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected, whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

    He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

    He has obstructed the Administration of Justice by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers.

    He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

    He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

    He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.

    He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil Power.

    He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:

    For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

    For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:   

    For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

    For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

    For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of Trial by Jury:

    For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences:

    For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies

    For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:

    For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

    He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.

    He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

    He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & Perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.

    He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.

    He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

    In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

    Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

    We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States, that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. — And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.

— ---John Hancock

New Hampshire:
Josiah Bartlett
, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton

John Hancock
, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry

Rhode Island:
Stephen Hopkins
, William Ellery

Roger Sherman
, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott

New York:
William Floyd
, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris

New Jersey:
Richard Stockton
, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark

Robert Morris
, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross

Caesar Rodney
, George Read, Thomas McKean

Samuel Chase
, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton

George Wythe
, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton

North Carolina:
William Hooper
, Joseph Hewes, John Penn

South Carolina:
Edward Rutledge
, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton

Button Gwinnett
, Lyman Hall, George Walton

The Declaration was yesterday published and proclaimed from that awful state in the State-house yard...The bells rang all day and almost all night. 

John Adams to Samuel Chase, July 9, 1776, Philadelphia

Why is it that, next to the birthday of the Savior of the world, your most joyous and most venerated festival returns on this day [the Fourth of July]?" “Is it not that, in the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior? That it forms a leading event in the progress of the Gospel dispensation? Is it not that the Declaration of Independence first organized the social compact on the foundation of the Redeemer's mission upon earth? That it laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity"?
John Quincy Adams, 1837, at the age of 69, when he delivered a Fourth of July speech at Newburyport, Massachusetts

Congressional Proclamation, 1782, following the Revolutionary War:

     It being the indispensable duty of all Nations, not only to offer up their supplications to Almighty God, the giver of all good, for His gracious assistance in a time of distress, but also in a solemn and public manner to give Him praise for His goodness in general, and especially for great and signal interpositions of His providence in their behalf;  Therefore the United States in Congress assembled, taking into their consideration the many instances of divine goodness to these States, in the course of the important conflict in which they have been so long engaged; the present happy and promising state of public affairs; and the events of the war, in the course of the year now drawing to a close; particularly the harmony of the public Councils, which is so necessary to the success of the public cause; the perfect union and good understanding which has hitherto subsisted between them and their Allies, notwithstanding the artful and unwearied attempts of the common enemy to divide them; the success of the arms of the United States, and those of their Allies, and the acknowledgment of their independence by another European power, whose friendship and commerce must be of great and lasting advantage to these States:  Do hereby recommend to the inhabitants of these States in general, to observe, and request the several States to interpose their authority in appointing and commanding the observation of Thursday the twenty-eight day of November next, as a day of solemn Thanksgiving to God for all his mercies: and they do further recommend to all ranks, to testify to their gratitude to God for his goodness, by a cheerful obedience of His laws, and by promoting, each in his station, and by His influence, the practice of true and undefiled religion, which is the great foundation of public prosperity and national happiness. 


In the beginning of the contest with Britain, when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayers in this room for Divine protection. Our prayers, Sir, were heard, and they were graciously answered… do we imagine we no longer need His assistance?

Benjamin Franklin, Constitutional Convention, Thursday June 28, 1787


The moral principles and precepts contained in the Scriptures ought to form the basis of all of our civil constitutions and laws....All the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery and war, proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.
Noah Webster

The three branches of the U.S. Government: Judicial, Legislative, Executive


     At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, James Madison proposed the plan to divide the central government into three branches.  He discovered this model of government from the Perfect Governor, as he read Isaiah 33:22:

“For the LORD is our judge,
the LORD is our lawgiver,
the LORD is our king;
He will save us.”

         "When the completed Constitution was sent to the States for ratification, Richard Henry Lee opposed it as anti-democratic and anti-Christian.  However, as one of Virginia's first Senators, he helped assure passage of the amendments that he believed corrected many of the document's gravest faults—the Bill of Rights."


         "At the time of the adoption of the constitution, and of the amendment to it, now under consideration [i.e., the First Amendment], the general, if not the universal sentiment in America was, that Christianity ought to receive encouragement from the state, so far as was not incompatible with the private rights of conscience, and the freedom of religious worship."   [Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States p. 593]  Justice Joseph Story

On January 19, 1853, the Senate Judiciary Committee delivered:

 ......They ("great and good men who were coeval with the government, who were in Congress and in the Presidency when this constitutional amendment was adopted") had no fear or jealousy of religion itself, nor did they wish to see us an irreligious people; they did not intend to prohibit a just expression of religious devotion by the legislators of the nation, even in their public character as legislators; they did not intend to spread over all the public authorities and the whole public action of the nation the dead and revolting spectacle of atheistical apathy. The Reports of the Committees of the Senate of the U.S. for the Second Session of the Thirty-Second Congress, 1852-53 (Washington: Robert Armstrong, 1853).

Alexander Hamilton began work with the Rev. James Bayard to form The Christian Constitutional Society to help spread over the world the two things which Hamilton said made America great:
(1) Christianity   (2) a Constitution formed under Christianity.

A watchful eye must be kept on ourselves, lest while we are building ideal monuments of renown and bliss here, we neglect to have our names enrolled in the annals of Heaven. 

James Madison to William Bradford, November 9, 1771


Image 1 of 1, Battle hymn of the Republic. By Mrs. Julia Ward Ho

Our forefathers, inhabitants of the island of Great Britain, left their native land, to seek on these shores a residence for civil and religious freedom.  At the expense of their blood, at the hazard of their fortunes, without the least charge to the country from which they removed by unceasing labour, and an unconquerable spirit, they effected settlements in the distant and inhospitable wilds of America, then filled with numerous and warlike barbarians."  

A Declaration by the Representatives of the United Colonies of North America, Now Met in Congress at Philadelphia, Setting Forth the Causes and Necessity of Their Taking Up Arms, July 16, 1775


They accomplished a revolution which has no parallel in the annals of human society.  They reared the fabrics of governments which have no model on the face of the globe.  They formed the design of a great Confederacy, which it is incumbent on their successors to improve and perpetuate.

  James Madison

 "He (Samuel Adams) was indeed poor; but he could be tempted neither by British gold, nor by the honours or profits of any office within the gift of the royal governor. Such patriotism has not been common in the world; but in America it was to be found in many a bosom, during the revolutionary struggle. The knowledge of facts like this, greatly diminishes the wonder, which has sometimes been expressed, that America should have successfully contended with Great Britain. Her physical strength was comparatively weak; but the moral courage of her statesmen, and her soldiers, was to her instead of numbers, of wealth, and fortifications."  Rev. Charles A. Goodrich Lives of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence. New York: William Reed & Co., 1856. Pages 81-92.




    Battle hymn of the Republic by Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. Published by the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments. [n. d.]
Music Division

    The music on these pages is for personal enjoyment. These midis have been gathered from many sources on the www and are believed to be in the public domain.

    Any and all copyrights belong to their respective authors.

    Image of declaration from  Image: Us declaration independence.jpg  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The original Declaration is now exhibited in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom in Washington, DC.

Political Fact Sheets -Signers of the Declaration

1676 Thanksgiving Proclamation

    The Holy God having by a long and Continual Series of his Afflictive dispensations in and by the present Warr with the Heathen Natives of this land, written and brought to pass bitter things against his own Covenant people in this wilderness, yet so that we evidently discern that in the midst of his judgments he hath remembered mercy, having remembered his Footstool in the day of his sore displeasure against us for our sins, with many singular Intimations of his Fatherly Compassion, and regard; reserving many of our Towns from Desolation Threatened, and attempted by the Enemy, and giving us especially of late with many of our Confederates many signal Advantages against them, without such Disadvantage to ourselves as formerly we have been sensible of, if it be the Lord's mercy that we are not consumed, It certainly bespeaks our positive Thankfulness, when our Enemies are in any measure disappointed or destroyed; and fearing the Lord should take notice under so many Intimations of his returning mercy, we should be found an Insensible people, as not standing before Him with Thanksgiving, as well as lading him with our Complaints in the time of pressing Afflictions:

    The Council has thought meet to appoint and set apart the 29th day of this instant June, as a day of Solemn Thanksgiving and praise to God for such his Goodness and Favour, many Particulars of which mercy might be Instanced, but we doubt not those who are sensible of God's Afflictions, have been as diligent to espy him returning to us; and that the Lord may behold us as a People offering Praise and thereby glorifying Him; the Council doth commend it to the Respective Ministers, Elders and people of this Jurisdiction; Solemnly and seriously to keep the same Beseeching that being persuaded by the mercies of God we may all, even this whole people offer up our bodies and souls as a living and acceptable Service unto God by Jesus Christ.





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on the rising glory of America by Brackenridge


Fair science smiling and full truth revealed,
The world at peace, and all her tumults o'er,
The blissful
prelude to Emanuel's reign.


Yet hear a part.--By persecution wrong'd
And popish cruelty, our fathers came
From Europe's shores to find this blest abode,
Secure from tyranny and hateful man.

For this they left their country and their friends
And plough'd th' Atlantic wave in quest of peace;
And found new shores and sylvan settlements
Form'd by the care of each advent'rous chief,
Who, warm in liberty and freedom's cause,
Sought out uncultivated tracts and wilds,
And fram'd new plans of cities, governments
And spacious provinces: Why should I name
Thee Penn, the Solon of our western lands;
Sagacious legislator, whom the world
Admires tho' dead: an infant colony
Nurs'd by thy care, now rises o'er the rest
Like that tall Pyramid on Memphis' stand
O'er all the lesser piles, they also great.

Why should I name those heroes so well known
Who peopled all the rest from Canada
To Georgia's farthest coasts, West Florida
Or Appalachian mountains, yet what streams
Of blood were shed! What Indian hosts were slain
Before the days of peace were quite restor'd.


Yes, while they overturn'd the soil untill'd,
And swept the forests from the shaded plain
'Midst dangers, foes and death, fierce Indian tribes
With deadly malice arm'd and black design,
Oft murder'd half the hapless colonies.
Encourag'd too by that inglorious race
False Gallia's sons, who once their arms display'd
At Quebec, Montreal, and farthest coasts
Of Labrador and Esquimaux where now
The British standard awes the coward host.

Here those brave chiefs, who lavish of their blood
Fought in Britannia's cause, most nobly fell.
What Heart but mourns the untimely fate of Wolf,
Who dying conquer'd, or what breast but beats
To share a fate like his, and die like him?


And he demands our lay who bravely fell
By Monangahela and the Ohio's stream;
By wiles o'ercome the hapless hero fell,
His soul too gen'rous, for that dastard crew
Who kill unseen and shun the face of day.

Ambush'd in wood, and swamp and thick grown hill,
The bellowing tribes brought on the savage war.
What could avail O Braddock then the flame,
The gen'rous flame which fir'd thy martial soul!
What could avail Britannia's warlike troops,
Choice spirits of her isle? What could avail
America's own sons? The skulking foe,
Hid in the forest lay and sought secure,
What could the brave Virginians do o'erpower'd
By such vast numbers and their leader dead?

'Midst fire and death they bore him from the field,
Where in his blood full many a hero lay.
'Twas there O Halkut! thou so nobly fell,
Thrice valiant Halkut early son of fame!
We still deplore a fate so immature,
Fair Albion mourns thy unsuccesful end,
And Caledonia sheds a tear for him
Who led the bravest of her sons to war.



Such is the curse Eugenio where the soul
Humane is wanting, but we boast no seats
Of cruelty like Spain's unfeeling sons.
The British Epithet is merciful:
And we the sons of Britain learn like them
To conquer and to spare; for coward souls
Seek their revenge but on a vanquish'd foe.

Gold, fatal gold was the assuring bait
To Spain's rapacious mind, hence rose the wars
From Chili to the Caribbean sea,
O'er Terra-Firma and La Plata wide.
Peru then sunk in ruins, great before
With pompous cities, monuments superb
Whose tops reach'd heav'n. But we more happy boast
No golden metals in our peaceful land,
No flaming diamond, precious emerald,
Or blushing sapphire, ruby, chrysolite
Or jasper red; more noble riches flow
From agriculture and th' industrious swain,
Who tills the fertile vale or mountain's brow,
Content to lead a safe, a humble life
'Midst his own native hills; romantic scenes,
Such as the muse of Greece did feign so well,
Envying their lovely bow'rs to mortal race.


Hither they've wing'd their way, the last, the best
Of countries where the arts shall rise and grow
Luxuriant, graceful; and ev'n now we boast
A Franklin skill'd in deep philosophy,
A genius piercing as th' electric fire,
Bright as the light'nings flash explain'd so well
By him the rival of Britannia's sage.
This is a land of ev'ry joyous sound
Of liberty and life; sweet liberty!
Without whose aid the noblest genius fails,
And science irretrievably must die.

This is a land where the more noble light
Of holy revelation beams, the star
Which rose from Judah lights our skies, we feel
Its influence as once did Palestine
And Gentile lands, where now the ruthless Turk
Wrapt up in darkness sleeps dull life away.

Here many holy messengers of peace
As burning lamps have given light to men.
To thee, O Whitefield! favourite of Heav'n,
The muse would pay the tribute of a tear.
Laid in the dust thy eloquence no more
Shall charm the list'ning soul, no more
Thy bold imagination paint the scenes
Of woe and horror in the shades below;
Or glory radiant in the fields above;
No more thy charity relieve the poor;
Let Georgia mourn, let all her orphans weep.

For him we sound the melancholy lyre,
The lyre responsive to each distant sigh;
No grief like that which mourns departing souls
Of holy, just and venerable men,
Whom pitying Heav'n sends from their native skies
To light our way and bring us nearer God.

But come Leander since we know the past
And present glory of this empire wide,
What hinders to pervade with searching eye
The mystic scenes of dark futurity?
Say shall we ask what empires yet must rise
What kingdoms pow'rs and states where now are seen
But dreary wastes and awful solitude,
Where melancholy sits with eye forlorn

A glorious theme, but how shall mortals dare
To pierce the mysteries of future days,
And scenes unravel only known to fate.


And here fair freedom shall forever reign.
I see a train, a glorious train appear,
Of Patriots plac'd in equal fame with those
Who nobly fell for Athens or for Rome.
The sons of Boston resolute and brave
The firm supporters of our injur'd rights,
Shall lose their splendours in the brighter beams
Of patriots fam'd and heroes yet unborn.


This is thy praise America thy pow'r
Thou best of climes by science visited
By freedom blest and richly stor'd with all
The luxuries of life. Hail happy land
The seat of empire the abode of kings,
The final stage where time shall introduce
Renowned characters, and glorious works
Of high invention and of wond'rous art,
Which not the ravages of time shall wake
Till he himself has run his long career;
Till all those glorious orbs of light on high
The rolling wonders that surround the ball,
Drop from their spheres extinguish'd and consum'd;
When final ruin with her fiery car
Rides o'er creation, and all nature's works
Are lost in chaos and the womb of night.
Let His Kingdom Com


Selected excerpts taken from A poem, on the rising glory of America by Hugh Henry Brackenridge,

first three lines above taken out of order from poem

Brackenridge was an American writer, lawyer, judge, and justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.  He founded the University of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Gazette, still operating today as the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette







.The story of how colonial America, under the rule of England, became a nation unto its own sizzles with faith inside the hearts and biographies of the founding fathers.  America's scrappy, sloppy ragtag army was ill prepared, but their unwavering belief in the right of freedom under God held back the greatest military might in the world.  A must-have status book of patriotic proclamation for each Christian library. 

@2009 Gospelgifs


Godly Minds, Bold Hearts

 the book October 2009


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